Saturday, November 27, 2010

Homeland Security shuts down dozens of Web sites without court order




When the government is given absolute power the Constitution becomes null and void. The Constitution was purpoely written to curb the abusive powers of the government. We live in a country with laws with due process. When the government disregards due process, their intention is very clear. They want to control us in every aspect of our daily life.

(Raw Story.com) The Homeland Security Department's customs enforcement division has gone on a Web site shutdown spree, closing down at least 76 domains this week, according to online reports.

While many of the web domains were sites that trafficked in counterfeit brand name goods, and some others linked to copyright-infringing file-sharing materials, at least one site was a Google-like search engine, causing alarm among web freedom advocates who worry the move steps over the line into censorship.

All the shut sites are now displaying a Homeland Security warning that copyright infringers can face up to five years in prison.

Homeland Security's ability to shut down sites without a court order evidently comes from the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, a Clinton-era law that allows Web sites to be closed on the basis of a copyright complaint. Critics have long assailed the DMCA for being too broad, as complainants don't need to prove copyright infringement before a site can be taken down.

According to a report at TorrentFreak, the search engine that was shut down -- Torrent-Finder.com -- neither hosted copyrighted material nor directly linked to places where it could be found. The owner of Torrent-Finder.net complained that his search engine was shut down without so much as a court order or prior complaint.