Saturday, October 15, 2011

Obama Plans to Use Anti-Wall St Anger to Campaign Cash



Never allow a good crisis go to waste. It is the mantra and belief of Obama's idiotic philosophy. The Obama team wants to make Wall Street look as the bad guy and the government look as the good guy. It is ignorance and class envy that brought the mass of idiots to Wall Street. People forget that Wall Street comprises of companies that provide jobs in America. These companies are under strict regulation, and it is force upon by the government. For example, the debt-card fees impose by banks are regulations imposed by the government, aka the Durbin Amendment. The Durbin Amendment is a bill sponsored by Democrat Senator Dick Durbin. While many ignorant individuals jump the throat of the banks and greedy corporations, it is important not to shoot the messenger, but rather, go to the source.

(Washington Post) President Obama and his team have decided to turn public anger at Wall Street into a central tenet of their reelection strategy.

The move comes as the Occupy Wall Street protests gain momentum across the country and as polls show deep public distrust of the nation’s major financial institutions.

And it sets up what strategists see as a potent line of attack against Republican front-runner Mitt Romney, a former investment executive whom Obama aides plan to portray as a wealthy Wall Street sympathizer.

Many Democrats consider Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, the greatest threat to Obama when it comes to wooing centrist independents next year, and Romney this week has begun to present himself as a champion of middle-income Americans.

Obama aides point to recent surveys that show anger at Wall Street spanning ideologies, including a new Washington Post-ABC News poll in which 68 percent of independents and 60 percent of Republicans say they have unfavorable impressions of the big financial institutions.

But the strategy of channeling anti-Wall Street anger carries risks. Many of Obama’s senior advisers have ties to the financial industry — a point that makes Occupy protesters wary of the president and his party.

In recent days, Obama has ramped up his rhetoric. He took the unusual step of targeting an individual company when he attacked Bank of America for its new $5 monthly debit-card fee, calling it “exactly the sort of stuff that folks are frustrated by.” And his campaign and the White House have distributed messages blasting GOP candidates and lawmakers for wanting to repeal Wall Street regulations pushed by Obama and opposing the confirmation of a leader for the consumer protection bureau created as part of the overhaul.

“We intend to make it one of the central elements of the campaign next year,” Obama senior adviser David Plouffe said in an interview. “One of the main elements of the contrast will be that the president passed Wall Street reform and our opponent and the other party want to repeal it.”

“I’m pretty confident 12 months from now, as people make the decision about who to go vote for, the gut check is going to be about, ‘Who would make decisions more about helping my life than Wall Street?’ ” Plouffe added.